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Ten rape prevention tips:

1. Don’t put drugs in women’s drinks.

2. When you see a woman walking by herself, leave her alone.

3. If you pull over to help a woman whose car has broken down, remember not to rape her.

4. If you are in an elevator and a woman gets in, don’t rape her.

5. When you encounter a woman who is asleep, the safest course of action is to not rape her.

6. Never creep into a woman’s home through an unlocked door or window, or spring out at her from between parked cars, or rape her.

7. Remember, people go to the laundry room to do their laundry. Do not attempt to molest someone who is alone in a laundry room.

8. Use the Buddy System! If it is inconvenient for you to stop yourself from raping women, ask a trusted friend to accompany you at all times.

9. Carry a rape whistle. If you find that you are about to rape someone, blow the whistle until someone comes to stop you.

10. Don’t forget: Honesty is the best policy. When asking a woman out on a date, don’t pretend that you are interested in her as a person; tell her straight up that you expect to be raping her later. If you don’t communicate your intentions, the woman may take it as a sign that you do not plan to rape her.

Rape prevention tips

Posted by Leigh Hofheimer under Prevention

"Pull Out" method

The pull out method is method of birth control in which a man, during intercourse, withdraws his penis from a woman’s vagina prior to orgasm (and ejaculation).

The vast majority of people do NOT do the pull out method properly. Because of this, more than 1/4 couples who use this method become pregnant. 

image

So. Where do these people go wrong? Lets talk about the issues in detail:

#1. Precum: Precum is the clear, colorless, fluid that is emitted from the urethra of the penis during sexual arousal to neutralize the urethra so the sperm can survive. It also makes it easier for semen to go through. For most men, precum does not contain any sperm. HOWEVER, on its way out, the precum can pick up sperm that is already in the urethra from a previous ejaculation. 

A solution to this is to always go pee before you have sex. 

#2. TIMING: Accidents are VERY common. Failing to pull out on time is one of the main causes of unplanned pregnancies/ pregnancy scares. 

In order to correctly execute the pull out method you need to practice, know your body, and have complete self control. Practice with a condom on, or while masturbating. Learn to know when to pull out.

#3. Ejaculating near the vagina: The “pull out method” still requires the sperm to be nowhere near the vagina/ vulva. Another mistake is ejaculation getting on the outside part of your vagina. Women can still get pregnant this way because the sperm finds its way in.

Instead of risking getting sperm anywhere near the vagina, try ejaculating into a towel/ rag (maybe even a pair of boxers that are lying around). 

The pull out method requires a lot of trust. This method is best for monogamous couples who trust each other and have experience with each others bodies. Remember, both of you should feel comfortable with this method. Anyone who respects and loves you will gladly agree to use a condom if you decide you don’t want to use this method.

This method is NOT good for new couples, an inexperienced partner, or someone who says “don’t worry, ill just pull out” when you want to use a condom.

Lessons learned: Know how to correctly use this method before actually doing it. This is a two person method and both you and your partner need to know how to correctly and safely execute this. The pull out method can be very effective but ONLY if you know how to do it. 

Censorship and The Female Body

Menstruation tshirt by Petra Collins for American Apparel

I wasn’t shocked at the reaction I received from my t-shirt. I’m used to being told by society that I must regulate my body to fit the norm. I’m used to the fact that images of unaltered women are seen as unacceptable. I’ve taught myself to ignore it (as much as I can) and through the Internet (via sites like ROOKIE) and social media platforms (like Instagram and Facebook) I’ve been able to freely share images and start discussions about these issues. Recently I had my Instagram account deleted. I did nothing that violated the terms of use. No nudity, violence, pornography, unlawful, hateful, or infringing imagery. What I did have was an image of MY body that didn’t meet society’s standard of “femininity”. The image I posted was from the waist down wearing a bathing suit bottom in front of a sparkly backdrop. Unlike the 5,883,628 (this is how many images are tagged #bikini) bathing suit images on Instagram (see here and here) mine depicted my own unaltered state – an unshaven bikini line. Up until this moment I had obviously seen and felt the pressure to regulate my body but never thought I would literally experience it.

I’m used to seeing female bodies perfected and aspects concealed in the media (i.e. in hair removal ads for women hair is NEVER shown). I wasn’t surprised when TMZ requested to interview me about my t-shirt but then cancelled because the image was “too explicit for television” – whereas during Rihanna’s abuse scandal her beaten up face was broadcasted hundreds of times. I’m used to seeing women being degraded, slut shamed, harassed for what they look like. Even the most powerful women in the world are measured by their appearance and constantly ridiculed for it. I’m used to one of the biggest media outlets calling a 9-year old girl a “cunt” (with the intention of being “satirical”). I’m used to hearing the top played songs on the radio tell me  ”I know you want it – just let me liberate you”, “You don’t know you’re beautiful, that’s what makes you beautiful”, “Put molly all in her champagne/ She ain’t even know it / I took her home and I enjoyed that/ She ain’t even know it”. I’m used to seeing blockbuster movies get a rating of NC-17 because a woman is shown receiving pleasure -while movies that feature men receiving pleasure get ratings as low as PG.

I’m used to seeing cover after cover featuring stories about a popular celebrity being fat-shamed during pregnancy. I’m used to seeing reviews of an award show performance that critiques a female singer for being “slutty” but then fails to even mention the older male behind her. I’m used to reading articles about whole towns harassing a rape victim until she’s forced to leave. I don’t want to be used to this. I don’t want to have to see the same thing constantly. I don’t want to be desensitized to what’s happening around me all.the.time. I consider myself endlessly lucky to have access to the Internet and technology. Through it I’ve found myself and have been able to join a new discourse of females young and old who strive to change the way we look and treat ourselves. I know having a social media profile removed is a 21st century privileged problem – but it is the way a lot of us live. These profiles mimic our physical selves and a lot of the time are even more important. They are ways to connect with an audience, to start discussion, and to create change. Through this removal I really felt how strong of a distrust and hate we have towards female bodies. The deletion of my account felt like a physical act, like the public coming at me with a razor, sticking their finger down my throat, forcing me to cover up, forcing me to succumb to societies image of beauty. That these very real pressures we face everyday can turn into literal censorship.

If the Internet mimics real life then there is no doubt that real life can mimic it. That if we allow ourselves to be silenced or censored it can happen in real life too. That if an online society of people can censor your body what stops them from doing so in real life. This is already happening, you experience this everyday. When someone catcalls at you, yells “SLUT”, comments on all your Facebook photos calling you “disgusting”, tries to physically violate you, spreads private nude images of you to a mass amount of people via text, calls you ugly, tells you to change your body, tells you are not perfect, this cannot continue to be our reality. To all the young girls and women, do not let this discourage you, do not let anyone tell you what you should look like, tell you how to be, tell you that you do not own your body. Even if society tries to silence you keep on going, keep moving forward, keep creating revolutionary work, and keep this discourse alive. To those who reported me, to those who are disgusted by my body, to those who commented “horrible” or “disgusting” on an image of ME, I want you to thoughtfully dissect your own reaction to these things, please think about WHY you felt this way, WHY this image was so shocking, WHY you have no tolerance for it. Hopefully you will come to understand that it might not be you thinking these things but society telling you how to think.

Petra Collins, 2013